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  need help with a Writing question. All explanations and answers will be used to help me learn.

For this week you need to complete the following sections of the lesson plan: “Subject, Grade, and Standards” FOR 6TH GRADE MATH CLASS. You have to use the templates attached to create the correct lesson plan needed.

ATTACHED IS THE TEMPLATES MY UNIVERSITY USES. I HOPE YU UNDERSTAND WHAT IS NEEDED. CREATING WEEK 1 ONE OF 6TH GRADE MATH LESSON PLAN.

Checklist for Writing a Lesson Plan

A crucial part of Freed-Hardeman’s education program is writing effective lesson plans. While FHU’s lesson
planning expectations might be different than anything you have seen before (or currently use in your school), it
has proven to be an effective method for teaching our students how to write effective lesson plans.

The expectation is that you will reference this document each time you write a lesson plan. These are things that
will be expected in EVERY lesson plan you write. This document also helps provide an explanation/reminder of
what is expected in each section. The absence of these items and/or the items being incorrect will result in point
deductions. Use this checklist in conjunction with the provided Lesson Plan Rubric.

TASKSTREAM REMINDERS​:
● All lesson plans ​MUST​ be created in Taskstream and then submitted in Canvas.
● Lesson plans that are ​NOT​ created in Taskstream ​will not be graded and you will receive a zero on the

assignment.
● You are to use the ​FHU Lesson Plan Template rev. 2019​ (​no other template will be accepted​) in

Taskstream.
● Lesson plans submitted in the wrong template ​will not be graded and will receive a zero​.

Subject(s)​: Identify the subject the lesson plan for. (math, reading, music, etc.)

Grade​: Identify the ONE grade level the lesson plan is for. The lesson plan should be for ONE grade level, not

multiple grade levels. (The only exception to this is if you teach a single class that has students from
multiple grade levels. If this is the case – it MUST be noted in your lesson plan.)

Standards​: ​This is where you will type and/or copy/paste ​the standards on which you are basing your lesson.

Selected standards must be ​current​ Tennessee state standards (aka Tennessee Academic
Standards). When designing your lesson remember that you do not have to teach everything
contained in a single standard. ​While you must list the entire standard​, you must evaluate the
standard and decide what is appropriate for the single lesson being taught. Your ​learning
objective(s)​ will reflect only the part(s) of the standard being taught in the single lesson plan.
Indicate the portion of the standard the lesson will focus on by bolding and/or underlining the
portions you are focusing on OR striking out the parts that you are not including in your lesson plan.

Content Standard(s): ​Include all content standards that will be covered in your lesson.

Literacy Standard(s):​ ​ALL lessons​ ​must​ include at least one literacy standard. This identifies ​how

student will engage with the content through literacy during the lesson (which is
reading, writing, speaking, and/or listening). (​For math lessons​ – you should
refer to the math literacy standards.)

Practice Standard(s): ​ALL math and science lessons​ ​must​ also include at least one practice

standard.)

NOTE: ​Current Tennessee state standards can be found by searching “tn.gov state standards”
online.

1

Learning Segment​: Name the concept/idea that will be taught during the five lessons. (Used to be ​Unit Topic​)
For example: ​The Writing Process

Central Focus​: Identify ​HOW​ the students will engage with the big idea/concept ​of the learning segment​ (aka

unit). The central focus ​must have a measurable verb​. Example: ​Students will follow the steps
of the writing process to ​write​ a persuasive essay​. (​REMEMBER​ – the central focus ​is not​ ​the
same as the ​learning objective(s)​. The ​central focus​ is broad to cover the idea/concept of the
learning segment​, while the ​learning objective(s)​ only cover the idea/topic/content of the single
lesson.)

Learning Context: ​This section outlines the learning arc for the lesson you chose for the lesson plan. The lesson

segment will differ slightly for each lesson in the ​learning segment​. List, label, and explain
what will occur in the following three sections of the learning arc. Make sure the learning
context (learning arc) is accurate and appropriate for the lesson you chose from your
learning segment​.

Prior Knowledge/Skills – ​This is where you identify the related learning that has taken place before this

lesson. Is it a review lesson? Is this the first lesson in a new unit of study?
Have students learned something in your class, or in a previous grade, that
provided base knowledge? Have you collaborated with a teacher in another
content area that has provided base knowledge/skills?

Current Lesson – ​This is where you will identify how this current lesson fits into the learning arc. (You
need to explain this here so it is clear that you understand how this lesson fits into the
learning arc.) Explain/state what you will be doing in this lesson and how it fits into the
learning arc of ​where you have been​ and ​where you are going​.

Subsequent Lessons – ​This is where you identify the related learning that will take place after this

lesson. If it’s the last lesson in the unit, identify it as such as well as explain
what new learning will happen next.

Lesson Title​: Identify the topic of your lesson plan – ​which is a sub-topic of your learning segment​.

For example: ​Editing

2

Learning ​Objective​(s), Assessments, and Knowledge Levels

Learning Objective(s) Assessments and Knowledge Levels ​(Bloom’s​ ​and
DOK Level)

● Only write objectives for
the skills to be covered in
the ​single lesson​.

● Your ​learning

objective(​s)​ ​MUST​ be
aligned with the state
standards you selected for
your lesson.

● Each ​learning ​objective

must begin with a
variation of “The learner
will be able to” which can
be shortened into an
acronym (TLWBAT).

● Each ​learning ​objective

must include a
measurable verb ​ such as
identify, sort, or create.

● Each ​learning ​objective

should contain a single
skill. For example,
“TLWBAT brainstorm,
draft, and edit a
persuasive essay.
Brainstorm, draft, ​and​ edit
are three different skills.
You must have a ​learning
objective​ for each skill –
but remember that you
should only include the
skills to be covered in the
single lesson ​.

● If you would like, you can

list your I Can/Target
statement(s) in this
section, also. ​However, it
is not required ​. If you do
add them, add another
column to the table.

● List specific assessments ​that are aligned​ to the ​standards​ and ​learning ​objective​s
you chose for your lesson. Ask yourself… ​How will I know if my students met the
learning ​objective​s I outlined for the lesson? ​ Then make sure you ​label and
specifically explain​ each assessment in this section, making sure to include
measurement criteria​ for each assessment ​except the in-lesson formative
assessments.

● Each lesson ​must​ contain​ each of the following types of assessments.

○ In-Lesson Formative/informal Assessments​ (labeled ​INL​) used throughout
the lesson to gauge student progress toward the ​learning ​objective​(s).
Multiple​ ​formative in-lesson​ assessments should be listed.​ For example: ​ILF​ –
Observing students when they do practice problems, white-board practice, hand
signaling during questioning, charting.

○ End-of-Lesson Formative/Informal Assessment(s)​ (labeled ​ELF​) at the end
of the lesson to gauge student progress toward the ​learning ​objective​(s). For
example: ​ELF​ – ​Students will complete an exit ticket with four addition problems.
I expect 80% of students to demonstrate mastery.

○ Short-Term Summative/Formal Assessment(s)​ that are used once mastery is
expected (typically at the end of a lesson/​learning segment​.) Remember that
one lesson taught on a subject does not encompass mastery. You must provide
at least one ​short-term summative assessment ​(labeled ​STS​).​ ​For example:
STS​- Students will research and create a brochure on one of the eight planets.
OR​ ​STS​- Students will complete an end of unit (learning segment) test. 85% of
students will score an 80% or higher.

○ Long-Term Summative/Formal Assessments​ are used once mastery is
expected, but also to see if students are retaining material long-term. You must
provide at least ​two​ ​long-term summative assessment ​(labeled ​LTS​).​ ​Some
examples of ​LTS​ ​include: spiral reviews, ​benchmark tests, end-of-semester
project, semester exam, end-of-course test, and standardized state tests.

You ​must ​identify the Bloom’s level of ​each​ assessment listed. You ​may​ also identify the
DOK level for each assessment if you wish.

It is expected that there will be a range of levels used, with an intentional effort to include
higher levels.

You will identify the knowledge levels by putting them in parenthesis right behind
each assessment.

● Here are some examples of ​measurement criteria.

○ 80% of students will master fractions scoring 80% or higher.
○ I anticipate (names of students) to master punctuation at 80% or higher.
○ I anticipate (names of students) to partially master punctuation at 70-79%.

NOTE​: Number your objectives, assessments, and knowledge levels to show how they correspond.

3

Vocabulary​:
General – ​This identifies what we want students to do. Provide term(s) and definition(s). For example,

some terms you might list and define here include discuss, apply, and organize.

Academic – ​Academic content vocabulary students will need to know/use. Provide term(s) and

definition(s). For example, some terms you might list and define here include decimal,
essay, constitution, and atom.

Language Function: ​Verb(s) in the ​learning objective(s)​.

Discourse: ​Identify ​HOW​ students will engage in discourse (talking and writing) using the ​academic vocabulary

listed and defined. This must be included in the ​lesson activities​ and ​procedure​ sections of this
lesson plan.

Syntax: ​Identify ​what the ​students​ will do​ to organize their thoughts/learning. For example, students complete

a t-chart or venn diagram to help them compare/contrast content; students create a table or graph to
represent mathematical or scientific data; or students label a map of oceans or countries. This must be
included in the ​lesson activities​ and ​procedure​ sections of this lesson plan.

Note​ – The four sections contained in this box make up the ​academic language​ section of your lesson plan. To
score a “4” on the edTPA Rubric 4, you must identify how ​“Targeted language supports address use of (1)
vocabulary, (2) language function, ​AND​ one or more additional language demands (syntax and/or
discourse) in ways that develop content understanding.”

Questioning Techniques

Learning
Objective(s)

What questions do you plan on asking during the lesson? (What should
students be able to answer?) AND Bloom’s Level of each question

Copy these ​ from the
Learning Objectives,
Assessments, and
Knowledge Level ​table
above.

● Question sequence is closely aligned to the selected standards and learning objectives for
the lesson

● All questions are sequenced with attention to the instructional goals
● Questions are varied and high quality, providing a balanced mix of question types:

○ knowledge and comprehension;
○ application and analysis; and
○ creation and evaluation

● Questions require students to cite evidence throughout the lesson
● Questions are consistently purposeful and coherent
● Questions assess and advance student understanding
● Questions are provided in list form
● Questions are included in the procedure section ​AND​ are identified by highlighting or bolding

You ​must ​identify the Bloom’s level of ​each​ question listed individually. It is expected that
there will be a range of levels used, with an intentional effort to include higher levels

You will identify the knowledge levels by putting them in parenthesis right behind each
question.

NOTE​: Number your objectives, questions, and Bloom’s levels to show how they correspond.

4

Lesson Activities: ​(Formerly ​summary​) – Identify/list all the activities in your lesson and ​give the reader a
picture of what they would expect to see if they were observing your lesson​. You
should NOT restate the ​learning objectives ​in this section. ​Do this as a bulleted list.

Length of Lesson: ​Identify the length of the ONE class in which you are teaching this lesson. (Each lesson plan

must be for only ONE class period that is being taught on a single day.)

Procedure: ​This is the most involved section of the lesson plan and includes the ​Introduction​, ​Instruction​, and

Closure​ sections. ​Remember that you must identify and label these sections.​ ​This entire
section (Introduction, Instruction, and Closure) must be scripted​. Scripting means that you
should write everything out like you will be saying it to the students. Scripting ​is not​ ​writing a
description of what you will be doing/saying. To aid with the pacing of your lesson plan, use either
timestamps (i.e. 8:25) or activity lengths (i.e. 5 minutes) throughout.

Introduction: ​Should be about 5-10 minutes, must include a strong hook, and must identify the learning
with an I Can/Target statement. (An I Can/Target statement is when you take the ​learning
objective(s) ​and word it so it is “kid friendly.” For example, I can identify three
characteristics of an artifact.) No instruction (new learning) should occur during the
introduction.

Instruction: ​This is the main portion of your lesson where all instruction will occur. Any guided and

independent practice during the lesson should also occur here. Make sure to include the
questions you plan on asking your students throughout the lesson. Input and monitor
should be labeled.

● Input ​(labeled I) ​is when students are GETTING information. That could be you

(the teacher) telling them the information, students researching or reading,
students sharing information with each other, etc.

● Monitor ​(labeled M)​ ​is when you are assessing student learning. If it involves
you asking students questions, then you must include the question(s) you plan to
ask. If it involves you walking around to monitor student progress, you must
include what monitor, assess, and provide feedback to the students during that
time.

Closure: ​The purpose of the conclusion is to provide a time of lesson summary and should take about
5-10 minutes total. This is NOT where you summarize the activities you have done in the
lesson, but where you will lead students through activities in which they will summarize the
learning they have done in the lesson. List, label, and explain what will occur in the following
three sections of the conclusion:

I do​ – This is when the teacher summarizes the learning in the lesson.
We do​ – A time in which the students engage in a brief activity that allows them to

summarize/reflect on the learning in the lesson.
You do​ – A time that students work independently to provide evidence of their progress

toward the daily learning ​objective​(s).

5

Extended Learning: ​Identify the activity, or activities, you will use to extend the learning in this lesson in a
meaningful way. (Will students have written homework? Reading? Questions to answer?
Questions to ask parents?) ​These activities are NOT optional​. You may or may not use
them for grading purposes.

Here are some examples of extended learning:

● For homework, the students will complete questions 1-10 on page 47 of the
textbook.

● In preparation for tomorrow’s lesson, think about the provided question and be
prepared to share and discuss your thoughts in class tomorrow.

● When you go home tonight, ask your parents how technology was different when
they were growing up. Be prepared to share what they said in class tomorrow.

● Now that we have learned what unit rates are, look for a real-life example and
bring it into class.

Differentiated Instruction: ​In this section you must specifically state how you will differentiate your lesson for

each of the following three groups. Make sure you identify and label each of the
three groups listed here (​Enrichment, Support, ELL/ESL)​. It is expected that you
identify specific students (real or fictional) in the following groups. When you do this,
you should ​not​ use real names and instead use codes such as ​Boy 1 ​or ​Girl 3​. For
example, ​Boy 1 will be provided with a scribe to help him complete the venn
diagram. ​In addition to individual accommodations, you may also provide broader
differentiated strategies for groups of students. For example, ​Enrichment​ –
Students will be challenged by being required to answer the question, “How would
have the Civil War ended if Abraham Lincoln had not been the President during this
time?”

Enrichment – ​ Identify how you will challenge the learners who more easily master the content of your
lesson. Think about how you can make the work more challenging for them (for example,
go higher on Bloom’s Taxonomy). Giving them more work or pairing them with lower
learners is ​not​ acceptable. It is also ​not​ acceptable to say they will not need
differentiated instruction because they will be able to master the content easily.

Support – ​Identify how you will support the learners who struggle with mastering the content of the
lesson. Remember that all students are expected to meet the minimal grade-level
expectations for the standard(s) selected for your lesson. How will you scaffold for them?
Giving them less work or pairing them with higher learners is ​not​ acceptable. It is also ​not
acceptable to simply state that the accommodations/modifications of an IEP/504 will be met.

ELL/ESL – ​ Identify how you will support the learners whose native language is not English and need

additional support. Remember that the students in this group will vary in their needs. Some
may speak/understand no, or almost no, English while others will have a much greater
command of the English language. Just providing information in their native language is ​NOT
an acceptable strategy. Also, you can not guarantee that you will have an aid in the room, so
saying that they will work with an aid is not an acceptable strategy. Finally, while you may not
have any ELL/ESL students in your class, you must still provide acceptable differentiated
strategies for this group.

6

Materials Used in the Lesson: ​List ALL materials needed/used to teach this lesson. Make sure to include any
links, handouts, PPTs, pencils, paper, pens, manipulatives, etc. ​ANYTHING
you or your students need for the lesson must be included here. The reason for
this is that someone else should be able to pick up your lesson plan and use
this list to collect ​ALL​ needed materials.

7

Lesson Alignment Funnel

Subject
Grade

Standards
Learning Segment

Lesson Title

Central Focus

Learning Objectives
Assessments

Instructional Methods/Strategies
and Questions

Lesson Activities

Bloom’s Taxonomy

Graphic taken from https://notjustanybrickinthewall.wordpress.com/2012/09/15/blooms-taxonomy-a-practical-approach-for-deeper-learning/ on 8.10.18

Lesson Plan Rubric
Freed-Hardeman University College of Education

Meets Expectations Approaching Expectations Does Not Meet Expectations Not Evident

Subject ● Clearly identifies the subject of the lesson
plan

● Identifies the subject of the lesson plan ● Incorrect subject has been listed ● Section is blank
or There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

Grade ● One grade level is identified (unless there are
multiple grade levels in a single class)

● Correct grade level is identified

● More than one​ ​grade level is identified
(unless there are multiple grade levels
in a single class), or

● Incorrect grade level is identified

● More than one​ ​grade level is identified
(unless there are multiple grade levels
in a single class)

● Section is blank
There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

Standards ● All standards must be current Tennessee
State Standards

● Both content and literacy standards are
included

● Math and/or science lessons include at least
one practice standard

● Each standard is listed in its entirety
● Portion of standard focused on for the lesson

is highlighted or bolded

● All standards must be current
Tennessee State Standards

● Literacy standards may not be included
● Math and/or science lessons may not

include at least one practice standard
● Each standard is listed in its entirety

● Standards are not current Tennessee
State Standards

● Both content and literacy standards are
not included

● Math and/or science lessons do not
include at least one practice standard

● Each standard is not listed in its
entirety

● Section is blank
There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

Learning Segment ● Closely aligns with the selected standards
● Clearly names the concept/idea that will be

taught during the five lessons in the unit

● Loosely aligns with the standards
● Names the concept/idea that will be

taught during the five lessons in the
unit

● Does not align with the standards,
and/or

● Does not name the concept/idea that
will be taught during the five lessons in
the unit

● Section is blank
There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

Central Focus ● Closely aligns with the selected standards
● Clearly identifies ​HOW​ the students will

engage with the big idea/concept of the
learning segment

● Includes a measurable verb

● Aligns with the selected standards
● It is unclear ​HOW​ the students will

engage with the big idea/concept of the
learning segment

● Includes a measurable verb

● Does not align with the selected
standards,

● It is unclear ​HOW​ the students will
engage with the big idea/concept of the
learning segment, and/or

● Does not include a measurable verb

● Section is blank
There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

Learning Context ● All components of the learning arc are listed,
labeled, and clearly explained

● Aligns with the learning segment and central
focus

● Appropriately outlines a learning arc for the
selected lesson

● Most components of the learning arc
are listed, labeled, and clearly
explained

● Aligns with the learning segment and
central focus

● Some or none of the components of
the learning arc are listed, labeled, and
clearly explained

● Does ​not​ align with the learning
segment and central focus

● Section is blank
There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

1

Meets Expectations Approaching Expectations Does Not Meet Expectations Not Evident

Lesson Title ● Closely aligns with the selected standards
and learning segment

● Clearly identifies the sub-topic of the learning
segment that will be taught during the lesson

● Loosely aligns with the selected
standards and learning segment

● Identifies the sub-topic of the learning
segment that will be taught during the
lesson

● Does not align with the selected
standards and/or learning segment,
and/or

● Does not accurately identify what will
be taught during the lesson

● Lesson topic is not a sub-topic of the
learning segment

● Section is blank
There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

Learning Objectives ● All learning objectives are closely aligned
with the selected standards for the lesson

● Includes the best measurable verb for the
learning goal

● Each learning objective:
○ contains a single skill
○ is concise, and
○ begins with an appropriate acronym

● All learning objectives are aligned with
the selected standards for the lesson

● Includes a measurable verb for the
learning goal

● Learning objectives not aligned with
the selected standards for the lesson

● Section is blank
There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

Assessments ● All assessments are closely aligned to the
selected standards and learning objectives
for the lesson

● Specific measurement criteria for all
assessments are included

● In-lesson formative, end-of-lesson formative,
short-term summative, ​and​ long-term
summative assessments are listed and
labeled

● Detailed description of each assessment is
provided

● Require a written task

● All assessments are aligned to the
selected standards and learning
objectives for the lesson

● Measurement criteria for some or most
of the assessments are included

● In-lesson formative, end-of-lesson
formative, short-term summative, ​and
long-term summative assessments are
listed and labeled

● Description of each assessment is
provided

● Listed assessments are not aligned to
the selected standards and learning
objectives for the lesson

● Measurement criteria is not included
for any assessments

● In-lesson formative, end-of-lesson
formative, short-term summative, ​and
long-term summative assessments are
not ​ listed and/or labeled

● Detailed description of each
assessment is not provided

● Section is blank
There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

Knowledge Levels
(of Assessments)

● The appropriate and accurate Bloom’s
Taxonomy level of each assessment listed is
identified

● Assessments cover a range of Bloom’s levels
with an intentional effort to include higher
order thinking

● The accurate Bloom’s Taxonomy level
of most assessments listed are
identified

● Assessments cover a range of Bloom’s
levels

● The accurate Bloom’s Taxonomy level
of the assessments listed are not
identified, and/or

● Assessments do not cover a range of
Bloom’s levels

● Section is blank
There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

Vocabulary
(General)

● Appropriate term(s) for how the students will
engage with the content are listed

● Each term has an accurate definition

● Term(s) for how the students will
engage with the content are listed

● Each term has an accurate definition

● A definition is not provided for each
term, and/or

● Inaccurate definitions are provided

● Section is blank
There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

Vocabulary
(Academic)

● Appropriate academic vocabulary term(s)
related to the content is listed

● Each term has an accurate definition

● Academic vocabulary term(s) related to
the content is listed

● Each term has an accurate definition

● A definition is not provided for each
term, and/or

● Inaccurate definitions are provided

● Section is blank
There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

2

Meets Expectations Approaching Expectations Does Not Meet Expectations Not Evident

Language Function ● Measurable verb(s) from the learning
objective(s) is listed

● Appropriate measurable verb(s) for the
lesson is listed; however, it is not the
measurable verb(s) from the learning
objectives for the lesson

● Verb(s) listed is neither from the
learning objective(s) for this lesson, nor
is it appropriate for the lesson

● Section is blank
There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

Discourse and
Syntax

When included:
● Discourse clearly identifies how students will

engage in discourse using the academic
vocabulary listed and defined, and/or

● Syntax clearly identifies what the students will
do to organize their thoughts/learning

● Is included in the procedure ​AND​ learning
activities sections of the lesson plan

When included:
● Discourse identifies how students will

engage in discourse using the
academic vocabulary listed and
defined, and/or

● Syntax identifies what the students will
do to organize their thoughts/learning

When included:
● Discourse does not identify how

students will engage in discourse using
the academic vocabulary listed and
defined, and/or

● Syntax does not identify what the
students will do to organize their
thoughts/learning

● Section is blank
There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

Questioning
Techniques:
Learning
Objectives(s)

● All learning objectives in this section are
identical to the ones in the ​Learning
Objectives, Assessments, and Knowledge
Level​ table

● Most learning objectives in this section
are identical to the ones in the
Learning Objectives, Assessments,
and Knowledge Level​ table

● Some or none of the learning
objectives in this section are identical
to the ones in the ​Learning Objectives,
Assessments, and Knowledge Level
table

● Section is blank
There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

Questioning
Techniques:
Questions

● Question sequence is closely aligned to the
selected standards and learning objectives
for the lesson

● All questions are sequenced with attention to
the instructional goals

● Questions are varied and high quality,
providing a balanced mix of question types:

○ knowledge and comprehension;
○ application and analysis; and
○ creation and evaluation

● Questions require students to cite evidence
throughout the lesson

● Questions are consistently purposeful and
coherent

● Questions assess and advance student
understanding

● Questions are provided in list form
● Questions are included in the procedure

section ​AND​ are identified by highlighting or
bolding

● Question sequence is aligned to the
selected standards and learning
objectives for the lesson

● Some questions are sequenced with
attention to the instructional goals

● Questions are varied and high quality,
providing for some, but not all,
question types:

○ knowledge and comprehension;
○ application and analysis; and
○ creation and evaluation

● Questions are purposeful and coherent
● Questions are provided in list form

● Question sequence is not aligned to
the selected standards and learning
objectives for the lesson

● Questions are not sequenced with
attention to the instructional goals

● Questions are inconsistent in quality
and include few question types:

○ knowledge and comprehension;
○ application and analysis; and
○ creation and evaluation

● Questions are random and lack
coherence

● Section is blank
There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

Questioning
Techniques:
Bloom’s Levels

● The appropriate and accurate Bloom’s
Taxonomy level of each question listed is
identified

● The accurate Bloom’s Taxonomy level
of most questions listed is identified

● The accurate Bloom’s Taxonomy level
of the questions listed are not identified

● Section is blank
There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

3

Meets Expectations Approaching Expectations Does Not Meet Expectations Not Evident

Lesson Activities

● All lesson activities are closely aligned to the
selected standards and learning objectives
for the lesson

● Students list, in bullet form, all activities to be
used in the lesson

● Provides a clear picture of what would be
seen if the lesson were being observed

● Some lesson activities are aligned to
the selected standards and learning
objectives for the lesson

● Students list all activities to be used in
the lesson

● Provides a picture of what would be
seen if the lesson were being observed

● Lesson activities are not aligned to the
selected standards and learning
objectives for the lesson

● Does not provide a picture of what
would be seen if the lesson were being
observed

● Items listed are learning objectives

● Section is blank
There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

Length of Lesson ● Length of lesson is appropriate for lesson
detail

● Time identified is for ​one​ class period

● Length of lesson is ​not ​appropriate for
lesson detail ​or

● Time identified is for ​more than one
class period

● Length of lesson is ​not ​appropriate for
lesson detail, and/or

● Time identified is for ​more than one
class period

● Section is blank
There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

Introduction ● Includes a strong hook
● No instruction (new learning) is taking place
● Learning is identified with an I Can or Target

statement
● Introduction is concise

● Includes a hook
● No instruction (new learning) is taking

place
● Learning is identified with an I Can or

Target statement

● Does not include a hook,
● Instruction (new learning) is taking

place, and/or
● Learning is not identified with an I Can

or Target statement

● Section is blank
There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

Instruction ● All instruction is closely aligned to the
selected standards and learning objectives
for the lesson

● Instruction methods/strategies are both
relevant and content appropriate

● Activities require students to interpret
information rather than reproduce it

● Activities require students to draw
conclusions and support them through writing

● There is an appropriate balance of input and
monitor

● Monitoring is meaningful
● A high frequency of questions is asked
● Input and monitor are accurately labeled

● Most instruction is aligned to the
selected standards and learning
objectives for the lesson

● Instruction methods/strategies are both
relevant and content appropriate

● There is a balance of input and monitor
● Monitoring is meaningful
● A moderate frequency of questions is

asked
● Input and monitor are labeled

● Instruction is not aligned to the
selected standards and learning
objectives for the lesson

● Instruction methods/strategies are
neither relevant nor content
appropriate

● Activities require students to mostly
reproduce information

● Activities rarely require students to
draw conclusions and support them
through writing

● A low frequency of questions is asked
● Input and monitor are not labeled

● Section is blank
There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

4

Meets Expectations Approaching Expectations Does Not Meet Expectations Not Evident

Closure

● The closure is closely aligned to the selected
standards and learning objectives for the
lesson

● Sections are correctly labeled ​I Do​, ​We Do​,
and ​You Do

● Closure provides a time of concise lesson
summary

● Closure includes all of the following:
○ Teacher briefly provides an appropriate

summary for the learning in the lesson
○ Students engage in a brief activity that

allows them to summarize/reflect on their
learning in the lesson

○ Students briefly work independently to
provide evidence of their progress toward
the daily learning objective(s)

● The closure is aligned to the selected
standards and learning objectives for
the lesson

● Sections are correctly labeled ​I Do​, ​We
Do​, and ​You Do

● Closure includes most of the following:
○ Teacher provides a summary of the

learning in the lesson
○ Students engage in an activity that

allows them to summarize/reflect
on their learning in the lesson

○ Students briefly work
independently to provide evidence
of their progress toward the daily
learning objective(s)

● Closure is not aligned to the selected
standards and learning objectives for
the lesson,

● Sections are not correctly labeled ​I Do​,
We Do​, and ​You Do, and/or

● Closure does not include at least one
of the following:

○ Teacher briefly summarizes the
learning in the lesson

○ Students engage in a brief activity
that allows them to
summarize/reflect on their learning
in the lesson

○ Students briefly work
independently to provide evidence
of their progress toward the daily
learning objective(s)

● Section is blank
There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

Procedure

● Provides appropriate time for all parts of the
lesson (introduction, instruction, student work
(within the instruction), and closure)

● Lesson is appropriate for the age, knowledge,
and interests of most learners

● The introduction, instruction, and closure
sections are:

○ Clearly listed and labeled
○ Scripted appropriately in great detail
○ Labeled with either timestamps or activity

lengths

● Provides time for all parts of the lesson
(introduction, instruction, student work
(within the instruction), and closure)

● Lesson is appropriate for the age,
knowledge, and interests of some
learners

● The introduction, instruction, and
closure sections are:

○ Mostly listed and labeled
○ Scripted
○ Not labeled with either timestamps

or activity lengths

● Does not provide appropriate time for
all parts of the lesson (introduction,
instruction, student work (within the
instruction), and closure)

● Lesson is not appropriate for the age,
knowledge, and interests of the
learners

● The introduction, instruction, and
closure sections are:

○ Not clearly listed and labeled
○ Not scripted

● Section is blank
There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

Extended Learning ● Activity/activities extend the lesson’s learning
in a meaningful way and are closely aligned
to the selected standards and learning
objective(s) for this lesson

● Activity/activities extend the lesson’s
learning and are aligned to the
selected standards and learning
objective(s) for this lesson

● Activity/activities do not extend the
lesson’s learning and/or and are not
aligned to the selected standards and
learning objective(s) for this lesson

● Section is blank
There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

5

Meets Expectations Approaching Expectations Does Not Meet Expectations Not Evident

Differentiated
Instruction:
Enrichment

● Identifies how the teacher will challenge the
learners who more easily master the content
of the lesson

● Strategy is appropriate for the
activity/activities

● Identifies how the teacher will
challenge the learners who more easily
master the content of the lesson

● Does not identify how the teacher will
challenge the learners who more easily
master the content of the lesson,

● Pairs students with those who need
support,

● Gives the students more work instead
of more challenging work, and/or

● States the learners do not need
differentiation because they will easily
master the content

● Section is blank
There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

Differentiated
Instruction:
Support

● Identifies how the teacher will support the
learners who struggle with mastering the
content of the lesson

● All students are expected to meet minimum
grade level standards

● Strategy is appropriate for the
activity/activities

● Identifies how the teacher will support
the learners who struggle with
mastering the content of the lesson

● All students are expected to meet
minimum grade level standards

● Does not identify how the teacher will
support the learners who struggle with
mastering the content of the lesson ,

● Pairs students with those who need
enrichment,

● All students are not expected to meet
minimum grade level standards

● Gives the students less work instead of
appropriate support, and/or

● Only states that IEP/504
accommodations and/or modifications
will be met

● Section is blank
There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

Differentiated
Instruction:
ELL/ESL

● Identifies how the teacher will support the
learners whose native language is not
English and need additional support

● Strategy is appropriate for the
activity/activities

● Identifies how the teacher will support
the learners whose native language is
not English and need additional
support

● Does not identify how the teacher will
support the learners whose native
language is not English and need
additional support,

● States that they will provide materials
in the student’s native language,

● States an aid will work with the
student(s), and/or

● States they do not need to provide any
strategies because they do not have
any ELL/ESL students

● Section is blank
There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

Materials Used in
the Lesson

● All necessary resources for this lesson are
listed and/or attached

● Most of the necessary resources for
this lesson are listed and/or attached

● Few of the necessary resources for this
lesson are listed and/or attached

● Section is blank
There is not
enough
evidence to give
score

Mechanics ● Contains no major spelling and/or grammar
mistakes

● Contains few major spelling and/or
grammar mistakes

● Contains many major spelling and/or
grammar mistakes

● Numerous
mistakes

6

Some indicators in this document were taken from the Tennessee TEAM rubric found at ​http://team-tn.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/TEAM-General-Educator-Rubric-2018-19.pdf
on July 9, 2018.

7