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Discussion Forum Week 1

Initial Postings: Your initial post should be based upon the assigned reading for the week, so the textbook must be the primary source utilized and listed in your reference section (and properly cited within the body of the text. Other sources are not required but feel free to use them if they aid in your discussion. This means that they support the material from the textbook. Do not use other sources to substitute for or replace the textbook. 

Provide a graduate-level response to the question or questions provided within the Discussion Forum. Kloppenborg textbook must substantively support every answer.

Your post must be substantive and demonstrate insight gained from the course material. Postings must be in the student’s own words – do not provide quotes!

 

Provide a graduate-level response to each of the following questions:

  1. Using an example of your own, describe a project in terms that are common to most projects. Define the terms based on Kloppenborg text and then apply these to your example.
  2. Discuss how a project could be successful in terms of some measures yet unsuccessful by others.
  3. Compare and contrast project managers and functional managers.

    Your initial post should be at least 500+ words and in APA format (written , using proper paragraph structure, sources cited within the body of the main text and Times New Roman with font size 12). FYI – Meeting the minimum for length does not meet the standard for superior scores.

    Submitting the Initial Posting: Your initial post should be completed by Thursday, 11:59 p.m. EST. 

    Response to Other Student Postings:  Respond substantively (at least 100 words) to the post of at least two peers, by Friday, 11:59 p.m. EST. A peer response such as “I agree with her,” or “I liked what he said about that” or similar comments are not considered substantive and will not be counted for course credit. Also, just repeating information from the course material or your own initial post does not satisfy these criteria.

    Continue the discussion through Sunday, 11:59 p.m. EST by highlighting differences between your postings and your colleagues’ postings. Provide additional insights or alternative perspectives. This means an on-going conversation in addition to the two required responses above.

    Evaluation of posts and responses: Your initial posts and peer responses will be evaluated on the basis of the kind of critical thinking and engagement displayed. The grading rubric evaluates the content based on four areas: Content Knowledge & Structure, Critical Thinking, Presentation & Writing Mechanics, and Response to Other Students.

 

Preview for Week 2 – Problem Set #1

Preview for Week 2 – Problem Set #1Attached Files:

Attached you will find the instructions in preparation for Problem Set #1 due the end of Week 2. This will provide you an opportunity to think about and identify a project you may utilize to complete this assignment and then utilize through the rest of the term as you build toward your Final Individual Project Charter. 

 

Week 1 Discussion

Week 1 DiscussionThis week our focus is on defining data visualization.  Therefore, after reviewing all of the content this week, answer all of the following questions in the initial prompt.Answer all of the following questions in the initial prompt.

  1. What is your definition of data visualization?
  2. What are the key components of data visualization?
  3. What techniques do you hope to learn from this course?

Students should engage on three separate days (the initial post by Wednesday and two additional days with peers) with peers with substantive posts. Be sure to refer to the grading rubric for additional discussion board requirements. This should be a minimum of 300 words, original work, use and cite a reference, and check your work with Grammarly.
 

 

  • Week 1 AssignmentComplete the following assignment in one MS word document:Chapter 1 –discussion question #1 & exercise 15 (limit to one page of analysis for question 15)Chapter 2 – discussion question #1 & exercises 4, 5, and 15(limit to one page of analysis for question 15)When submitting work, be sure to include an APA cover page and include at least two APA formatted references (and APA in-text citations) to support the work this week.All work must be original (not copied from any source).

 

Chapter 1

Discussion Question #1: Survey the literature for the past six months to find one application of each for DSS, BI, and Analytics. Summarize the application in one page and submit it with exact sources (in-text & corresponding reference list).

Exercise #15: Find information about IBM Watson’s activities in the healthcare field. Write a one-page report. Submit it with exact source(s) (in-text & corresponding reference list).

Chapter 2

Discussion Question #1: Discuss the difficulties in measuring the intelligence of machines.

Exercise #4: In 2017, McKinsey & Company created a five-part video titled “Ask the AI Experts: What Advice Would You Give to Executives About AI? View the video and summarize the advice given to the major issue discussed.

Exercise #5: Watch the McKinsey & Company video (3:06 min.) on today’s drivers of AI at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yv0IG1D-OdU and identify the major AI drivers. Write a report.

Exercise #15: Explore the AI-related products and services of Nuance Inc. (nuance.com) Explore the Dragon voice recognition product. Write a report. (limit to one page of analysis for exercise 15).

  • Week 1: Discussion 1Create a discussion thread (with your name) and answer the following question:Discussion 1 (Chapter 1): Compare and contrast predictive analytics with prescriptive and descriptive analytics. Use examples.Note: The first post should be made by Wednesday 11:59 p.m., EST. I am looking for active engagement in the discussion.  Please engage early and often.Your response should be 250-300 words.  Respond to two postings provided by your classmates.There must be at least one APA formatted reference (and APA in-text citation) to support the thoughts in the post.  Do not use direct quotes, rather rephrase the author’s words and continue to use in-text citations.
  • Week 1: Discussion 2
    Week 1: Discussion 2Create a discussion thread (with your name) and answer the following question:

    Discussion 2 (Chapter 2): Discuss the process that generates the power of AI and discuss the differences between machine learning and deep learning.Note: The first post should be made by Wednesday 11:59 p.m., EST. I am looking for active engagement in the discussion.  Please engage early and often.Your response should be 250-300 words.  Respond to two postings provided by your classmates.There must be at least one APA formatted reference (and APA in-text citation) to support the thoughts in the post.  Do not use direct quotes, rather rephrase the author’s words and continue to use in-text citations.

BUSINESS CASE

Identify a project that is of interest to you. The best source would be through a general internet search and/or local media sources. When selecting a project of interest to you, avoid picking one that is either too big or too small. For example, do not decide to build a new stadium for your local sports team (too big) or to plant your summer garden (too small). Select a project that you can relate to and have some experience with or that may be ongoing or recently completed in your hometown. Projects must be within the budget range of $500,000 to $5,000,000. Project time frame must be between 6 months and 3 years. To ensure you are on the right track, you can ask your instructor’s advice in selecting an appropriate project. You will be using this project throughout the course to complete future Problem Sets.

Part 1: Provide a brief overview of the selected project. This will include an explanation of how the project specifically fits the four (4) elements of the Kloppenborg definition. The specific definition to utilize is as follows: “A project is a 1) new, 2) time-bound effort that has a definite beginning and a definite ending with 3) several related and/or interdependent tasks to 4) create a unique product or service” (Kloppenborg 2019, p. 4). This essay should be five (5) paragraphs long with the first paragraph providing the project overview and then one paragraph each explaining specifically how your selection fits each of the four (4) identified elements of a project. Do not just state that it does fit these four (4) elements you must thoroughly demonstrate that it does. Use examples from the project. This essay should be single-spaced and each paragraph indented. Do not number the paragraphs.

Part 2: Upon completion of the essay, you will draft a descriptive title for your project. The Project Title should be a descriptive statement of your project. This is not like a book title which is usually short and very simple. For example, in 1985 the I-71/I-75 Brent Spence Bridge, which spans the Ohio River between Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky, had the emergency lanes removed to add traffic lanes due to an increase in traffic over this bridge (third busiest bridge in the US). So, to ensure a descriptive project title, a simple title like “Brent Spence Bridge Project” would not be sufficient. This provides no information on the project scope. A more descriptive title would be “I-71/I-75 Brent Spence Bridge project to expand northbound and southbound traffic lanes from three lanes to four lanes (1985)”.

After creating a descriptive title for your project, you will draft a Business Case for your project. Using

exactly

one hundred (100) words you will provide a brief overview of the project including important scope information. The Business Case is the “bridge” between the high-level and very general Background and the more specific Project Scope Statement. It will include both why the project is needed and what, specifically, is going to be completed during the project. This should incorporate what work (or Deliverables/sub-projects) are going to be done during the project and does not mean what objectives the project hopes to achieve. For example, a bridge renovation project would need to state “solidify bridge pier structure” (a deliverable/sub-project) and not “increase vehicle traffic” (an objective).

Also, it needs to provide some scope elements to allow the reader to “picture” the project in their head. This includes items such as budget, size, time frame, and other specific and measurable elements of the project.


Assignment should be single-spaced. Do not change formatting of this template.

How does the selected project fit the four (4) elements of a project provided in the instructions? (400+ word, five paragraph essay):

Descriptive Project Title:

Business Case (
exactly

100 words):

CONTEMPORARY PROJECT MANAGEMENT, 4E

Timothy J. Kloppenborg

Vittal Anantatmula

Kathryn N. Wells

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‹#›

Introduction to Project Management

Chapter 1

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‹#›

The Element of Discipline

“A key to success in project management, as well as in mountain climbing, is to identify the pillars that will be practiced with discipline…I believe that project management is about applying common sense with uncommon discipline.”

Michael O’Brochta, PMP

founder of Zozer Inc.

previously senior project manager at the Central Intelligence Agency

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Deaths climbing Mt. Aconcagua are an extreme example of consequences associated with a lack of discipline

Discipline to act on the earlier decision to curtain summit attempts after the agreed-to-turn-around time or in severe weather

Avoid pressure to cast aside or shortcut project management practices

Practices, like planning, are the pillars of project management discipline

Managing projects at the CIA involved short notice to acquire unspent funds

Discipline required needed planning and quick action

The top 2 percent of project managers spend twice as much time planning as the other 98 percent

Identify those pillars that we will decide to practice with the required levels of discipline

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Chapter 1 Core Objectives

Define a project and project management and tell why organizations would use them

Describe major activities and deliverables, at each project life cycle stage

List the 10 knowledge areas and 5 process groups of the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK)

Describe project success and failure, as well as reasons both may occur

Contrast predictive and adaptive project life cycles

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4

Chapter 1 Behavioral Objectives:

Identify project roles and key responsibilities for project team members

Describe the importance of collaborative effort throughout a project

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What is a project?

Projects require:

an organized set of work efforts.

progressively elaborated detail.

a defined beginning and ending.

a unique combination of stakeholders.

Projects are subject to time and resource limitations

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project – “a temporary endeavor undertaken to

create a unique product, service, or result.” PMBOK® Guide

stakeholders – “an individual, or organization who may affect, be affected by, or perceive itself to be affected by a decision, activity, or outcome of a project.” PMBOK® Guide

A project requires an organized set of work efforts.

Projects require a level of detail that is progressively elaborated upon as more information is discovered.

Projects are subject to limitations of time and resources such as money and people.

Projects have a defined beginning and ending.

A project has a unique combination of stakeholders

6

Project Management (PM)

Work processes

Tradeoffs among

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Project management – “the application of knowledge, skills, tools and techniques to project activities to meet project requirements.” PMBOK® Guide

initiate, plan, execute, monitor/control, close

Scope Schedule

Quality Resources

Cost Risks

PM includes work processes that initiate, plan, execute, and close work

Work processes require tradeoffs among the scope, quality, cost, and schedule of the project

PM includes administrative tasks for planning, documenting, and controlling work

PM includes leadership tasks for visioning, motivating, and promoting work associates.

PM knowledge, skills, and methods apply for most projects

7

Project Management (PM)

Administrative tasks

Leadership tasks for work associates

Knowledge, skills, and methods apply for most projects

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Planning, documenting controlling

Visioning, motivating, promoting

PM includes administrative tasks for planning, documenting, and controlling work

PM includes leadership tasks for visioning, motivating, and promoting work associates.

PM knowledge, skills, and methods apply for most projects

8

History of PM

Emerged as a formal discipline in the 1950s

Developed for aerospace and construction

Involved determining and controlling project schedules

In 2001, Agile was created for adaptive project planning, originally for software projects

In recent years, more focus has been given to the “soft skills” of communications, leadership, and teamwork

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PM emerged as a formal discipline in the 1950s

Techniques for planning and controlling schedules and costs were developed for huge aerospace and construction projects in the 1950s and 1960s

Early PM involved determining project schedules based on order of project activities

Manufacturing, research and development, government, and construction projects used and refined management techniques

Software companies offered software for planning and controlling project costs and schedules in the 1980s and 1990s

Risk management techniques for complex projects have been applied to less complex projects

Communication and leadership playa major role in project success

Rapid growth and change in information technology and telecommunications fueled use of PM in the 1990s and 2000s

9

How Can Project Work Be Described?

Projects versus operations

Soft skills and hard skills

Authority and responsibility

Project Life Cycle

Agile (adaptive) vs. Waterfall (predictive) approach

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Projects are temporary and unique; operations are more continuous.

Project managers need “soft skills” and “hard skills” to be effective.

Project managers frequently have more responsibility than authority.

Projects go through predictable stages called a life cycle.

10

Projects Versus Operations

Projects are temporary

Projects have routine and unique characteristics

Operations are ongoing work

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Operations consist of the ongoing work needed to ensure that an organization continues to function effectively

11

Soft Skills and Hard Skills

Soft skills activities

Communication

Leadership

Conflict resolution

Hard skills activities

Risk analysis

Quality control

Scheduling work

Budgeting work

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A successful project manager needs both soft and hard skills along with the judgment of when each is more necessary.

Training, experience, and mentoring are instrumental in developing necessary skills.

12

Authority and Responsibility

One person being assigned accountability

Project managers negotiate with functional managers

Strong communication and leadership skills to persuade subordinates

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Functional manager – “someone with management authority over an organizational unit.…the manager of any group that actually makes a product or performs a service.” PMBOK® Guide

Projects are most effectively managed with one person being assigned accountability

Project managers negotiate with functional managers

A project manager needs to develop strong communication and leadership skills to persuade subordinates to focus on the project when other work beckons.

13

Project Life Cycle (PLC)

Project life cycles vary among different disciplines but generally are comprised of the same general stages

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Project life cycle – “the series of phases that a project goes through from its initiation to its closure.” PMBOK® Guide

Life cycle allows for control to assure that the project is proceeding in a satisfactory manner and that the results are likely to serve its customer’s intended purpose

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Project Life Cycle Stages

Selecting and initiating

Planning

Executing (includes monitoring/controlling)

Closing and realizing

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Selecting and initiating— a project is selected from an emerging idea, planned at a high level, and key participants commit to it in broad terms

Planning—starts after the initial commitment, includes detailed planning, and ends when all stakeholders accept the entire detailed plan.

Executing—includes authorizing, executing, monitoring, and controlling work until the customer accepts the project deliverables.

Closing and realizing—all activities after customer acceptance to ensure project is completed, lessons are learned, resources are reassigned, contributions are recognized, and benefits are realized.

15

Project Life Cycle (PLC)

A project must gain approval to move from one stage to the next

Projects are measured at additional points

Selection

Progress reporting

Benefits realization

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Predictive (Plan-Driven) PLC

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Predictive extreme        waterfall

Product is well-understood

All planning precedes all executing

17

Adaptive (Change-Driven) PLC

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Adaptive extreme        agile

Early results lead into planning later work

18

Midland Insurance PLC for Quality Improvement Projects

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Understanding Projects

Project Management Institute (PMI)

Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK)

PMI Talent Triangle

Selecting and Prioritizing Projects

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Understanding Projects

Project Goals and Constraints

Defining Project Success and Failure

Using MS Project

Types of Projects

Scalability of Project Tools

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The Project Management Institute (PMI)

The largest professional organization

Produces A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide)

Talent Triangle—Technical PM, Leadership, & Strategic and Business Management

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Over 650,000 members and credential holders in 185 countries

Publishes and regularly updates A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide)

22

The Project Management Institute (PMI)

Project Management Professional (PMP®) certification

Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM) certification

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Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK®)

Project Life Cycle

5 process groups

10 knowledge areas

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Project management process group – “a logical grouping of the project management inputs, tools and techniques, and outputs.” PMBOK® Guide

PMBOK® Process Groups

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Initiating— “define a project or a new phase by obtaining authorization”

Planning— “establish the project scope, refine objectives and define actions to attain objectives”

Executing— “complete the work defined to satisfy project specifications”

Monitoring and controlling— “track, review, and regulate progress and performance, identify changes required, and initiate changes”

Closing— “finalize all activities to formally close project of phase”

PMBOK®’s 10 Knowledge Areas

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Integration management – “processes and activities to identify, define, combine, unify, and coordinate the various processes and project management activities”

Scope management – “processes to ensure that the project includes all the work required, and only the work required, to complete the project successfully”

Schedule management – “processes to manage timely completion of the project”

PMBOK® Knowledge Areas

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Cost management – “processes involved in planning, estimating, budgeting, financing, funding, managing, and controlling costs so that the project can be completed within the approved budget”

Quality management – “processes and activities of the performing organization that determine quality policies, objectives, and responsibilities so that the project will satisfy the needs for which it was undertaken”

Resource management – “processes that organize, manage, and lead the project team”

PMBOK® Knowledge Areas

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Communications management – “processes to ensure timely and appropriate planning, collection, creation, distribution, storage, retrieval, management, control, monitoring, and ultimate disposition of project information”

Risk management – “processes of conducting risk management planning, identification, analysis, response planning, and control…to increase the likelihood and impact of positive events and decrease the likelihood and impact of negative events in the project”

PMBOK® Knowledge Areas

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Procurement management – “processes to purchase or acquire products, services, or results from outside the project team”

Stakeholder management – “processes to identify the people, groups, or organizations, that could impact or be impacted by the project, analyze their expectations and impact, and develop strategies for engaging them and managing conflicting interests”

Selecting and Prioritizing Projects

Identify potential projects

All parts of the organization are involved

Determine which projects align best with organizational goals

Organizational priorities:

Understood

Communicated

Accepted

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?

Selecting and Prioritizing Projects

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What value does each potential project bring to the organization?

Are the demands of performing each project understood?

Are the resources needed to perform the project available?

Is there enthusiastic support both from the external customers and from one or more internal champions?

Which projects will best help the organization achieve its goals?

Project Goals and Constraints

Projects are undertaken to accomplish specific goals

Scope and quality are performance goals

Subject to constraints of time and cost

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Scope – “the sum of the products, services, and results to be provided as a project.” PMBOK® Guide

Quality – “the degree to which a set of inherent characteristics fulfills requirements.” PMBOK® Guide

Scope and quality measure performance and should result in outputs that satisfy customers

Consider scope and quality subject to constraints of time and cost

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Project Goals and Constraints

Obstacles or challenges may limit ability to perform

Opportunities may allow projects to exceed original expectations.

Project Managers (PMs) decide which goals and constraints take precedence

Additional constraints

Amount of resources available

Decision maker’s risk tolerance

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Project Customer Tradeoff Matrix

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Break-out Session!

How do YOU define project success and failure?

What are some common reasons for project success or failure?

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Project Success and Failure

Deliverables include all agreed-upon features

Outputs please customers

Customers use the outputs effectively

Completed on schedule and on budget

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Project success is creating deliverables that include all of the agreed upon features

Outputs please the project’s customers.

Customers use the outputs effectively as they do their work (meet quality goals)

The project should be completed on schedule and on budget (meet time and cost constraints).

36

Project Success and Failure

Completed without heroics

Learn new and/or refine skills

Organizational learning

Reap business-level benefits

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Successful projects are completed without heroics

People who work on the project should learn new skills and/or refine existing skills.

Organizational learning should take place and be captured for future projects.

Reap business-level benefits such as development of new products, increased market share, increased profitability, decreased cost, etc.

37

Project Success

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Why Projects Fail

Insufficient resources and/or time

Unclear expectations

Changes in the scope not understood or agreed upon

Stakeholders disagree on expectations

Inadequate project planning

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Not enough resources are available for project completion.

Not enough time has been given to the project.

Project expectations are unclear.

Changes in the scope are not understood or agreed upon by all parties involved.

Stakeholders disagree regarding expectations for the project.

Adequate project planning is not used.

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Types of Projects

Classifying by industry

Classifying by size

Classifying by understanding of project scope

Classifying by application

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PMI Communities of Practice

Projects in different industries often have unique requirements

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Classifying by Size

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Large projects often require more detailed planning and control

Classifying by Timing of Project Scope Clarity

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How early in the project the project manager and team are able to determine the project scope

Classification by Application

All projects require planning and control

The art of project management:

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when to use certain techniques

how much detail to use

how to tailor techniques to the needs of a project.

Scalability of Project Tools

All projects require

Project specifications

Understanding of work involved

Budget and schedule determinations

Assignment of available workers to tasks

Project management

Projects are scaled up or down to meet the complexity of the task

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All projects require:

Determination of the wants and needs of the customer(s)

Understanding of the amount of work involved

Determination of a budget and schedule

Decisions about available workers and who will do which tasks

Management until the owner accepts the project results

45

Traditional Project Roles

Project Executive-Level Roles

Project Management-Level Roles

Project Associate-Level Roles

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Project Executive-Level Roles

The steering team

The top leader (CEO) and his/her direct reports

Select, prioritize, and resource projects

Ensure that accurate …

Chapter 1 Slides

Opening Example
 Opening Vignette
 KONE – minimize downtime and user’s suffering
 Solution – IBM Watson IoT Cloud Platform –minimized downtime and shortened repair time

 Changing business environments and evolving needs for decision support and
analytics
 Big-bet, high-risk decisions.
 Cross-cutting decisions, which are repetitive but high risk that require group work

(Chapter 11).
 Ad hoc decisions that arise episodically.
 Delegated decisions to individuals or small groups.

Decision-Making Process
 Four step process

 1. Define the problem (i.e., a decision situation that may deal with some difficulty
or with an opportunity).

 2. Construct a model that describes the real-world problem.

 3. Identify possible solutions to the modeled problem and evaluate the solutions.

 4. Compare, choose, and recommend a potential solution to the problem

 Other examples – Quain (2018)- 7 step process

Influence of External and Internal
Environments
 Technology

 Government
 Political
 Economic
 Sociological and psychological
 Environmental

Data and Its Analysis in Decision Making
 Organizations and industries use analytics to develop reports do make the best

decisions
 Timely
 Proactive
 Predictive

Technologies for Data Analysis and Decision
Support
 Group Communication and Collaboration

 Improved data management

 Managing big data

 Analytical support

 Overcoming cognitive limits in processing and storing information

 Knowledge management

 Anywhere and anytime support

Simon’s Process
 Three major phases
 Intelligence
 Design
 Choice

Issues in Data Collection
 Data are not available. As a result, the model is made with and relies on potentially

inaccurate estimates.
 Obtaining data may be expensive.
 Data may not be accurate or precise enough.
 Data estimation is often subjective.
 Data may be insecure.
 Important data that influence the results may be qualitative (soft).
 There may be too many data (i.e., information overload).
 Outcomes (or results) may occur over an extended period. As a result, revenues,

expenses, and profits will be recorded at different points in time. To overcome this
difficulty, a present-value approach can be used if the results are quantifiable.
 It is assumed that future data will be similar to historical data. If this is not the case, the

nature of the change has to be predicted and included in the analysis

Problem/Design/Choice/Implementation Phases
 Problem
 Classification
 Decomposition
 Ownership

 Design
 Models

 Choice

 Implementation

Decision Support System Framework
 Degree of Structuredness

 Types of Control

 Decision Support Matrix

 Computer Support for
Structured, Unstructured,
Semistructured Decisions

Characteristics & Capabilities of DSS

Components of a Decision Support System
 Data management subsystem

Model management Subsystem
 Model base

 MBMS

 Modeling language

 Model directory

 Model execution, integration, and command processor

User Interface Subsystem
 Natural language input

 Examples

 Price lookups: “Price 64GB iPhone X.”
 Currency conversions: “10 US dollars in euros.”
 Sports scores and game times: Just enter the name of a team (“NYC Giants”), and Google

SMS will send the most recent game’s score and the date and time of the next match.

Knowledge based management subsystem
 Support any of the other subsystems or act as an independent component. It

provides intelligence to augment the decision maker’s own or to help understand a
user’s query so as to provide a consistent answer.

Evolution of Computerized DSS

Framework of Business Intelligence
 Definitions of BI

 History of BI

 Architecture of BI

Data warehouse as a foundation of BI
 Transaction processing vs. analytic processing

Appropriate Planning and Alignment with
business strategy
 A center can demonstrate how BI is clearly linked to strategy and execution of strategy.
 A center can serve to encourage interaction between the potential business user

communities and the IS organization.
 A center can serve as a repository and disseminator of best BI practices between and

among the different lines of business.
 Standards of excellence in BI practices can be advocated and encouraged through-out

the company.
 The IS organization can learn a great deal through interaction with the user

communities, such as knowledge about the variety of types of analytical tools that are
needed.
 The business user community and IS organization can better understand why the DW

platform must be flexible enough to provide for changing business requirements.
 The center can help important stakeholders like high-level executives see how BI can

play an important role

Analytics
 the process of developing actionable decisions or recommendations for actions

based on insights generated from historical data.

What is big data?
 Big Data refers to data that cannot be stored in a single storage unit. Big Data

typically refers to data that come in many different forms: structured, un-structured,
in a stream, and so forth.

Analytics Examples in Selected Domains
 Sports

 Business Office

 Heathcare

 Retail value chain

Artificial Intelligence Overview
 AI is based on theories from several scientific fields, and it encompasses a wide

collection of technologies and applications. So, it may be beneficial to look at some
of the characteristics of AI in order to understand what it is. The major goal of AI is
to create intelligent machines that can do tasks currently done by people. Ideally,
these tasks include reasoning, thinking, learning, and problem solving.

 Benefits of AI
 Significant reduction in the cost of performing work. This reduction continues over time

while the cost of doing the same work manually increases with time.
 Work can be performed much faster.
 Work is consistent in general, more consistent than human work.
 Increased productivity and profitability as well as a competitive advantage are the major

drivers of AI.

Major AI technologies

Convergence of Analytics and AI
 Differences between Analytics and AI

 Why combine intelligent systems

 Big data empowers AI technologies

Overview of the Analytics EcoSystem

Wrap Up
 Review the Chapter highlights

 Review the key terms

 Complete the weekly homework

  • Analytics, Data Science, & Artificial Intelligence, 11 Edition
  • Opening Example
  • Decision-Making Process
  • Influence of External and Internal Environments
  • Data and Its Analysis in Decision Making
  • Technologies for Data Analysis and Decision Support
  • Simon’s Process
  • Issues in Data Collection
  • Problem/Design/Choice/Implementation Phases
  • Decision Support System Framework
  • Characteristics & Capabilities of DSS
  • Components of a Decision Support System
  • Model management Subsystem
  • User Interface Subsystem
  • Knowledge based management subsystem
  • Evolution of Computerized DSS
  • Framework of Business Intelligence
  • Data warehouse as a foundation of BI
  • Appropriate Planning and Alignment with business strategy
  • Analytics
  • What is big data?
  • Analytics Examples in Selected Domains
  • Artificial Intelligence Overview
  • Major AI technologies
  • Convergence of Analytics and AI
  • Overview of the Analytics EcoSystem
  • Wrap Up

Chapter 2 Slides

Opening Example /Intro to AI
 Opening Vignette
 INRIX

 Introduction to AI
 AI is concerned with two basic ideas: (1) the study of human thought processes (to

understand what intelligence is) and (2) the representation and duplication of those
thought processes in machines (e.g., computers, robots). That is, the machines are
expected to have humanlike thought processes.

Major Elements of AI

AI
 Goals

 Drivers

 Benefits

 Examples of AI at work

 Limitations of AI

 Three flavors of AI
 Assisted
 Autonomous
 Augmented

Human and Computer Intelligence
 Content of

Intelligence

 Capabilities of
Intelligence

 Comparing AI
to Human
Intelligence

Major AI Technologies and Derivatives
 Intelligent Agent

 Machine Learning

 Machine and
Computer Vision

 Robotics

 NLP

 Chatbots

AI Support for Decision Making
 Issues and Factors in using AI for decision making

 AI Support of the Decision-Making process
 Problem Identification
 Generating of finding alternative solutions
 Selecting a solution
 Implementing solution

 Automated decision making

AI Applications In Accounting/ Financial
Services/ HRM/Marketing…
 Accounting
 Examples in book
 AI in big accounting companies
 Accounting applications small firms

 Financial Services
 Banking
 Customer Recognition

 Human Resource Management (HRM)
 Talent Acquisition
 Chatbots

 Marketing
 Personalized marketing

Wrap Up
 Review the Chapter highlights

 Review the key terms

 Complete the weekly homework

  • Analytics, Data Science, & Artificial Intelligence, 11 Edition
  • Opening Example /Intro to AI
  • Major Elements of AI
  • AI
  • Human and Computer Intelligence
  • Major AI Technologies and Derivatives
  • AI Support for Decision Making
  • AI Applications In Accounting/ Financial Services/ HRM/Marketing…
  • Wrap Up

Contemporary
Project Management

Timothy J. Kloppenborg

Vittal Anantatmula

Kathryn N. Wells

F O U R T H E D I T I O N

Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. WCN 02-200-203

MS Project 2016 Instructions in Contemporary Project Management 4e

Chapter MS Project

3 MS Project 2016 Introduction

Ribbon, Quick Access Toolbar, view panes, Zoom Slider, Shortcuts, Scheduling Mode Selector

Setting Up Your First Project

Auto schedule, start date, identifying information, summary row

Create Milestone Schedule

Key milestones, zero duration, must finish on, information

7 Set Up a Work Breakdown Structure (WBS)

Understand the WBS definitions and displays

Enter WBS Elements (tasks), Create the outline,

Insert WBS Code Identifier column, Hide or show subtasks detail

8 Using MS Project for Critical Path Schedules

Set Up the Project Schedule

Set or update the project start date, Define organization’s working and nonworking time

Build the Network Diagram and Identify the Critical Path

Enter tasks and milestones, edit the timescale, understand and define task dependencies, assign task
duration estimates, identify the critical path, understand the network diagram view

Display and Print Schedules

9 Define Resources

Resource views, max units, resource calendars

Assigning Resources

Basic assignment, modify an assignment

Identify Overallocated Resources

Resource usage and Detailed Gantt views together

Overallocated Resources

Finding overallocated resources, dealing with overallocations

Crashing a Critical Path Activity

10 Develop Bottom-up Project Budget

Assignment costs, task costs, various cost perspectives

Develop Summary Project Budget

12 Baseline the Project Plan

First time baseline, subsequent baselines, viewing variances

14 Using MS Project to Monitor and Control Projects

What Makes a Schedule Useful?

How MS Project recalculates based on reported actuals, current and future impacts of variances, define
the performance update process (who, what, when)

Steps to Update the Project Schedule

Acquire performance data, set and display status date, Enter duration-based performance data,
reschedule remaining work, revise future estimates

15 Close Project

Creating project progress reports, sharing reports, export a report to MS Excel, archive project work,
capture and publish lessons learned

Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s).
Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it.

Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. WCN 02-200-203

PMBOK® Guide 6e Coverage in Contemporary Project Management 4e
The numbers refer to the text page where the process is defined.
Project management (PM) processes and knowledge areas 10–11 Project life cycle 7–10, 62–64
Projects and strategic planning 33–37 Organizational influences 102–110
Portfolio and program management 37–42

PMBOK® Guide, 6th ed. Coverage

Knowledge
Areas

Initiating
Process
Group Planning Process Group

Executing Process
Group

Monitoring &
Controlling
Process Group

Closing
Process
Group

Project
Integration
Management

Develop
Project
Charter
60–79

Develop Project Management Plan
409–410

Direct and Manage
Project Work 459–460
Manage Project
Knowledge 192–193,
504–508

Monitor and Control
Project Work 460–462
Perform Integrated
Change Control
229–232, 462–463

Close
Project
or Phase
503,
508–511

Project Scope
Management

Plan Scope Management 211–212
Collect Requirements 212–216
Define Scope 216–220
Create WBS 220–229

Validate Scope
500–501
Control Scope
475–476

Project
Schedule
Management

Plan Schedule Management 246
Define Activities 249–253
Sequence Activities 253–255
Estimate Activity Durations 255–258
Develop Schedule 259–267

Control Schedule
476–480

Project Cost
Management

Plan Cost Management 329–330
Estimate Costs 330–341
Determine Budget 342–344

Control Costs 345,
476–480

Project Quality
Management

Plan Quality Management 401–404 Manage Quality
404–406, 469–474

Control Quality
406–409, 469–474

Project
Resources
Management

Plan Resource Management 290–295
Estimate Activity Resources 290

Aquire Resources
138–141
Develop Team 141–157
Manage Team 157–161

Control Resources 476

Project Com-
munications
Management

Plan Communications Management
188–192

Manage
Communications
193–199, 465–467

Monitor
Communications
467–468

Project Risk
Management

Plan Risk Management 360–366
Identify Risks 75, 366–368
Perform Qualitative Risk Analysis 75,
368–372
Perform Quantitative Risk Analysis
372–373
Plan Risk Responses 75, 373–377

Implement Risk
Responses 464–465

Monitor Risks
463–464

Project
Procurement
Management

Plan Procurement Management
431–433, 438–441

Conduct
Procurements
434–438

Control Procurments
441

Project Stake-
holder
Management

Identify
Stakehold-
ers 75–77,
178–184

Plan Stakeholder Engagement 184–186 Manage Stakeholder
Engagement 187–188

Monitor Stakeholder
Engagement 188

Source: Adapted from A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide), 6th ed. (Newtown Square, PA: Project Management
Institute, Inc., 2017): 31.

Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s).
Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it.

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Contemporary Project
Management
ORGANIZE LEAD PLAN PERFORM

FOURTH EDITION

TIMOTHY J. KLOPPENBORG
Xavier University

VITTAL ANANTATMULA
Western Carolina University

KATHRYN N. WELLS
Keller Williams Real Estate

Australia • Brazil • Mexico • Singapore • United Kingdom • United States

Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s).
Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it.

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This is an electronic version of the print textbook. Due to electronic rights restrictions,
some third party content may be suppressed. Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed
content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. The publisher reserves the right
to remove content from this title at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it. For
valuable information on pricing, previous editions, changes to current editions, and alternate
formats, please visit www.cengage.com/highered to search by ISBN#, author, title, or keyword for
materials in your areas of interest.

Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product
text may not be available in the eBook version.

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Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it.

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Contemporary Project Management,
Fourth Edition

Timothy J. Kloppenborg

2019 2015

Cengage Learning Customer & Sales Support, 1-800-354-9706

www.cengage.com/permissions

[email protected]

2017947974

978 1 337 40645 1

Cengage Learning
20

02210

40
125

www.cengage.com.

www.cengage.com

www.cengagebrain.com

Printed in the United States of America
Print Number: 01 Print Year: 2017

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Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it.

Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. WCN 02-200-203

MS Project 2016 Instructions in Contemporary Project Management 4e

Chapter MS Project

3 MS Project 2016 Introduction

Ribbon, Quick Access Toolbar, view panes, Zoom Slider, Shortcuts, Scheduling Mode Selector

Setting Up Your First Project

Auto schedule, start date, identifying information, summary row

Create Milestone Schedule

Key milestones, zero duration, must finish on, information

7 Set Up a Work Breakdown Structure (WBS)

Understand the WBS definitions and displays

Enter WBS Elements (tasks), Create the outline,

Insert WBS Code Identifier column, Hide or show subtasks detail

8 Using MS Project for Critical Path Schedules

Set Up the Project Schedule

Set or update the project start date, Define organization’s working and nonworking time

Build the Network Diagram and Identify the Critical Path

Enter tasks and milestones, edit the timescale, understand and define task dependencies, assign task
duration estimates, identify the critical path, understand the network diagram view

Display and Print Schedules

9 Define Resources

Resource views, max units, resource calendars

Assigning Resources

Basic assignment, modify an assignment

Identify Overallocated Resources

Resource usage and Detailed Gantt views together

Overallocated Resources

Finding overallocated resources, dealing with overallocations

Crashing a Critical Path Activity

10 Develop Bottom-up Project Budget

Assignment costs, task costs, various cost perspectives

Develop Summary Project Budget

12 Baseline the Project Plan

First time baseline, subsequent baselines, viewing variances

14 Using MS Project to Monitor and Control Projects

What Makes a Schedule Useful?

How MS Project recalculates based on reported actuals, current and future impacts of variances, define
the performance update process (who, what, when)

Steps to Update the Project Schedule

Acquire performance data, set and display status date, Enter duration-based performance data,
reschedule remaining work, revise future estimates

15 Close Project

Creating project progress reports, sharing reports, export a report to MS Excel, archive project work,
capture and publish lessons learned

Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s).
Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it.

Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. WCN 02-200-203

PMBOK® Guide 6e Coverage in Contemporary Project Management 4e
The numbers refer to the text page where the process is defined.
Project management (PM) processes and knowledge areas 10–11 Project life cycle 7–10, 62–64
Projects and strategic planning 33–37 Organizational influences 102–110
Portfolio and program management 37–42

PMBOK® Guide, 6th ed. Coverage

Knowledge
Areas

Initiating
Process
Group Planning Process Group

Executing Process
Group

Monitoring &
Controlling
Process Group

Closing
Process
Group

Project
Integration
Management

Develop
Project
Charter
60–79

Develop Project Management Plan
409–410

Direct and Manage
Project Work 459–460
Manage Project
Knowledge 192–193,
504–508

Monitor and Control
Project Work 460–462
Perform Integrated
Change Control
229–232, 462–463

Close
Project
or Phase
503,
508–511

Project Scope
Management

Plan Scope Management 211–212
Collect Requirements 212–216
Define Scope 216–220
Create WBS 220–229

Validate Scope
500–501
Control Scope
475–476

Project
Schedule
Management

Plan Schedule Management 246
Define Activities 249–253
Sequence Activities 253–255
Estimate Activity Durations 255–258
Develop Schedule 259–267

Control Schedule
476–480

Project Cost
Management

Plan Cost Management 329–330
Estimate Costs 330–341
Determine Budget 342–344

Control Costs 345,
476–480

Project Quality
Management

Plan Quality Management 401–404 Manage Quality
404–406, 469–474

Control Quality
406–409, 469–474

Project
Resources
Management

Plan Resource Management 290–295
Estimate Activity Resources 290

Aquire Resources
138–141
Develop Team 141–157
Manage Team 157–161

Control Resources 476

Project Com-
munications
Management

Plan Communications Management
188–192

Manage
Communications
193–199, 465–467

Monitor
Communications
467–468

Project Risk
Management

Plan Risk Management 360–366
Identify Risks 75, 366–368
Perform Qualitative Risk Analysis 75,
368–372
Perform Quantitative Risk Analysis
372–373
Plan Risk Responses 75, 373–377

Implement Risk
Responses 464–465

Monitor Risks
463–464

Project
Procurement
Management

Plan Procurement Management
431–433, 438–441

Conduct
Procurements
434–438

Control Procurments
441

Project Stake-
holder
Management

Identify
Stakehold-
ers 75–77,
178–184

Plan Stakeholder Engagement 184–186 Manage Stakeholder
Engagement 187–188

Monitor Stakeholder
Engagement 188

Source: Adapted from A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide), 6th ed. (Newtown Square, PA: Project Management
Institute, Inc., 2017): 31.

Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s).
Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it.

Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. WCN 02-200-203

Brief Contents

Preface xx
About the Authors xxix

PART 1 Organizing Projects
1 Introduction to Project Management 2

2 Project Selection and Prioritization 32

3 Chartering Projects 60

PART 2 Leading Projects
4 Organizational Capability: Structure, Culture, and Roles 100

5 Leading and Managing Project Teams 136

6 Stakeholder Analysis and Communication Planning 176

PART 3 Planning Projects
7 Scope Planning 210

8 Scheduling Projects 244

9 Resourcing Projects 286

10 Budgeting Projects 328

11 Project Risk Planning 358

12 Project Quality Planning and Project Kickoff 386

PART 4 Performing Projects
13 Project Supply Chain Management 426

14 Determining Project Progress and Results 456

15 Finishing the Project and Realizing the Benefits 498

Appendix A PMP and CAPM Exam Prep Suggestions 522
Appendix B Agile Differences Covered 527
Appendix C Answers to Selected Exercises 532
Appendix D Project Deliverables 537
Appendix E Strengths Themes As Used in Project Management [Available Online]

Index 539

v
Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s).

Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it.

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Requirements
Documents

13.1 Identify
Stakeholders

Stakeholder

Register
Stakeholder
Engagement

Assessment Matrix

Integration

Scope

Schedule

Cost

Quality

Resources

Communication

Risk

Procurement

Stakeholders

12.1 Plan
Procurement
Management

11.1 Plan
Risk

Management

10.1 Plan
Communications

Management

9.1 Plan
Resource

Management

8.1 Plan
Quality

Management

7.1 Plan
Cost

Management

6.1 Plan
Schedule

Management

5.1 Plan
Scope

Management

Duration

Estimates

Scope
Statement

Activity List

Milestone List

Network

4.1 Develop
Project Charter

Charter

Assumptions Log

Cost Baseline

Resource Requirements

RACI
Team

Charter

Quality
Mgt.
Plan

Communications
Matrix

Risk Register

Bid
Documents
Make or Buy

Analysis

6.5 Develop
Schedule

Schedule Baseline

5.2 Collect
Requirements

5.4 Create
WBS

Scope

4.2 Develop Project Management Plan

Activities

9.2 Estimate
Activity

Resources

11.2 Identify
Risks

11.3 Perform
Qualitative

Risk Analysis

11.4 Perform
Quantitative
Risk Analysis

11.5 Plan
Risk

Responses

13.2 Plan
Stakeholders
Engagement

6.4 Estimate
activity

Durations

7.3 Determine
Budget

7.2 Estimate
Costs

6.3 Sequence
Activities

1.2 Foundational Elements

2.4 Organizational Systems

3.4 Project Manager Competencies
Selecting Projects

Project Customer Tradeoff Matrix

Life Cycle and Development Approach
Elevator Pitch

Leader Roles and Responsibilities
Project Selection and Prioritization Matrix
Project Resource Assignment Matrix

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11.6 Implement
Risk Responses

13.3 Manage
Stakeholder
Engagement

13.4 Monitor
Stakeholder
Engagement

4.3 Direct and Manage
Project Work

4.4 Manage Project
Knowledge

Scope
Baseline with WBS

Resource Histogram
Project Crashing

Retrospectives

Closure
Documents
Customer
Feedback
Transition Plan

Scope
Backlog

Burn
Down/Up

Charts

Quality
Reports

s
Analysis

Realizing
s

PM Plan Baselines Life Cycle
and Development Approach 4.7 Close Project

or Phase

6.6 Control
Schedule

Earned Value
Analysis

7.4 Control
Costs

5.6 Control
Scope

5.5 Validate
Scope

8.2 Manage
Quality

9.3 Acquire
Resources

9.4 Develop
Team

9.6 Control
Resources

9.5 Manage
Team

8.3 Control
Quality

Change
Requests

10.2 Manage
Communications

11.7 Monitor
Risks

10.3 Monitor
Communications

Team
Assignments

Team
Assessments

Agendas
Minutes

Issues Log
Meeting Evaluation
Progress Report

12.2 Conduct
Procurements

12.3 Control
Procurements

Source
Selection

Matrix

Lessons
Learned
Register

Quality
Measurements

4.6 Perform
Integrated

Change Control

4.5 Monitor and
Control

Project Work

Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s).
Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it.

Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. WCN 02-200-203

Contents

Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xx
About the Authors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxix

PART 1 Organizing Projects

CHAPTER 1
Introduction to Project Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.1 What Is a Project? 3

1.2 History of Project Management 5

1.3 How Can Project Work Be Described? 6
1.3a Projects versus Operations 6 / 1.3b Soft Skills and Hard Skills 7 / 1.3c Authority

and Responsibility 7 / 1.3d Project Life Cycle 7

1.4 Understanding Projects 10
1.4a Project Management Institute 10 / 1.4b Project Management Body of Knowledge

(PMBOK®) 10 / 1.4c The PMI Talent Triangle 11 / 1.4d Selecting and Prioritizing
Projects 14 / 1.4e Project Goals and Constraints 14 / 1.4f Defining Project Success
and Failure 15 / 1.4g Using Microsoft Project to Help Plan and Measure
Projects 16 / 1.4h Types of Projects 16 / 1.4i Scalability of Project Tools 17

1.5 Project Roles 17
1.5a Project Executive-Level Roles 18 / 1.5b Project Management-Level Roles 19 /

1.5c Project Associate-Level Roles 20

1.6 Overview of the Book 20
1.6a Part 1: Organizing and Initiating Projects 20 / 1.6b Part 2: Leading Projects 21 /

1.6c Part 3: Planning Projects 21 / 1.6d Part 4: Performing Projects 23

PMP/CAPM Study Ideas 23

Summary 24

Key Terms Consistent with PMI Standards and Guides 24

Chapter Review Questions 25

Discussion Questions 25

PMBOK® Guide Questions 26
Integrated Example Projects 27

Suburban Homes Construction Project 27

Casa DE PAZ Development Project 28

Semester Project Instructions 28

Project Management in Action 29

References 30

Endnotes 31

viii
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Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. WCN 02-200-203

CHAPTER 2
Project Selection and Prioritization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
2.1 Strategic Planning Process 33

2.1a Strategic Analysis 33 / 2.1b Guiding Principles 34 / 2.1c Strategic
Objectives 36 / 2.1d Flow-Down Objectives 37

2.2 Portfolio Management 37
2.2a Portfolios 38 / 2.2b Programs 39 / 2.2c Projects and Subprojects 39 /

2.2d Assessing an Organization’s Ability to Perform Projects 42 / 2.2e Identifying
Potential Projects 42 / 2.2f Using a Cost-Benefit Analysis Model to Select
Projects 43 / 2.2g Using a Scoring Model to Select Projects 45 / 2.2h Prioritizing
Projects 48 / 2.2i Resourcing Projects 48

2.3 Securing Projects 49
2.3a Identify Potential Project Opportunities 50 / 2.3b Determine Which Opportunities to

Pursue 50 / 2.3c Prepare and Submit a Project Proposal 51 / 2.3d Negotiate to
Secure the Project 51

PMP/CAPM Study Ideas 52

Summary 52

Key Terms Consistent with PMI Standards and Guides 52

Chapter Review Questions 53

Discussion Questions 53

PMBOK® Guide Questions 53
Exercises 54

Integrated Example Projects 55

Casa DE PAZ Development Project 56

Semester Project Instructions 56

Project Management in Action 57

References 58

Endnotes 59

CHAPTER 3
Chartering Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
3.1 What Is a Project Charter? 62

3.2 Why Is a Project Charter Used? 63

3.3 When Is a Charter Needed? 64

3.4 Typical Elements in a Project Charter 65
3.4a Title 65 / 3.4b Scope Overview 65 / 3.4c Business Case 66 /

3.4d Background 66 / 3.4e Milestone Schedule with Acceptance Criteria 66 /
3.4f Risks, Assumptions, and Constraints 67 / 3.4g Resource Estimates 69 /
3.4h Stakeholder List 69 / 3.4i Team Operating Principles 69 / 3.4j Lessons
Learned 70 / 3.4k Signatures and Commitment 70

3.5 Constructing a Project Charter 70
3.5a Scope Overview and Business Case Instructions 70 / 3.5b Background

Instructions 71 / 3.5c Milestone Schedule with Acceptance Criteria
Instructions 72 / 3.5d Risks, Assumptions, and Constraints Instructions 75 /
3.5e Resources Needed Instructions 75 / 3.5f Stakeholder List Instructions 75 /

Contents ix

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Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it.

Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. WCN 02-200-203

3.5g Team Operating Principles Instructions 77 / 3.5h Lessons Learned
Instructions 77 / 3.5i Signatures and Commitment Instructions 78

3.6 Ratifying the Project Charter 79

3.7 Starting a Project Using Microsoft Project 79
3.7a MS Project 2016 Introduction 80 / 3.7b Setting up Your First Project 81 /

3.7c Define Your Project 82 / 3.7d Create a Milestone Schedule 83

PMP/CAPM Study Ideas 88

Summary 88

Key Terms Consistent with PMI Standards and Guides 88

Chapter Review Questions 89

Discussion Questions 89

PMBOK® Guide Questions 89
Exercises 90

Integrated Example Projects 91

Casa DE PAZ Development Project 93

Semester Project Instructions 93

Project Management in Action 93

References 96

Endnotes 97

PART 2 Leading Projects

CHAPTER 4
Organizational Capability: Structure, Culture, and Roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
4.1 Types of Organizational Structures 103

4.1a Functional 103 / 4.1b Projectized 104 / 4.1c Matrix 105

4.2 Organizational Culture and Its Impact on Projects 109
4.2a Culture of the Parent Organization 110 / 4.2b Project Cultural Norms 111

4.3 Project Life Cycles 111
4.3a Define-Measure-Analyze-Improve-Control (DMAIC) Model 112 / 4.3b Research and

Development (R&D) Project Life Cycle Model 113 / 4.3c Construction Project Life
Cycle Model 113 / 4.3d Agile Project Life Cycle Model 113

4.4 Agile Project Management 114
4.4a What Is Agile? 114 / 4.4b Why Use Agile? 114 / 4.4c What Is an Agile

Mindset? 114 / 4.4d What Are the Key Roles in Agile Projects? 115 / 4.4e How Do
You Start an Agile Project? 115 / 4.4f How Do You Continue an Agile Project?
115 / 4.4g What Is Needed for Agile to Be Successful? 116

4.5 Traditional Project Executive Roles 116
4.5a Steering Team 116 / 4.5b Sponsor 117 / 4.5c Customer 119 / 4.5d Chief

Projects Officer/Project Management Office 121

4.6 Traditional Project Management Roles 121
4.6a Functional Manager 121 / 4.6b Project Manager 122 / 4.6c Facilitator 124

4.7 Traditional Project Team Roles 126
4.7a Core Team Members 126 / 4.7b Subject Matter Experts 126

x Contents

Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s).
Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it.

Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. WCN 02-200-203

4.8 Role Differences on Agile Projects 126

PMP/CAPM Study Ideas 128

Summary 128

Key Terms Consistent with PMI Standards and Guides 128

Chapter Review Questions 129

Discussion Questions 129

PMBOK® Guide Questions 129
Exercises 130

Integrated Example Projects 130

Casa DE PAZ Development Project 131

Semester Project Instructions 131

Project Management in …